Giordano cardano

Jump to navigation Jump to search Italophilia is the admiration, giordano cardano or emulation of Italy, its people, its ideals, its civilization or its culture. The extent to which Italian civilization has shaped Western civilization and, by extension, the civilization of the whole world, is widely recognized and acknowledged. Appreciation of the legacy of Italic ideals, civilization and culture has existed for many centuries, into the present day.

Rome was the center of an empire that stretched across a large segment of the then-known world, and later became the center of the Roman Catholic faith. For nearly 300 years Britain, reconciled to the Roman system, enjoyed in many respects the happiest, most comfortable, and most enlightened times its inhabitants have ever had. The Christian Faith was viewed in Rome as contrary to prevailing religious and political beliefs and, consequently, was suppressed. Many Christians in Rome and elsewhere were persecuted. The cultural patrimony of Roman literature, architecture and sculpture inspired many of the achievements of the Middle Ages and Renaissance in Italy and the rest of Europe. Techniques used in building roads, bridges, aqueducts, viaducts, etc.

After the fall of the Roman Empire, its vast governmental network provided a structure for the Roman Catholic Church’s ecclesiastic rule. The bishops, rather than the Roman prefects became the source of order and the seat of power. Church matured by inheriting and accepting the responsibilities of Rome. The civilization of Italy continued to be a cultural force that helped preserve Greco-Roman civilization and ideals during this period. Latin, the indigenous language of the Italic people, became the universal language of the Catholic Church and, generally, of culture and learning in Europe.

Western Monasticism, as first practiced by the followers of Saint Benedict, born in Nursia in 480 AD, spread from Italy to all parts of Europe. The Benedictine monks were a very important factor in preserving Greco-Roman culture and learning for later centuries. Gregorian Chant, an outgrowth of Roman plain chant, strongly influenced both liturgical and secular music during the Middle Ages. Western music and, subsequently, of music worldwide. Order of Friars Minor and the women’s Order of St. Clare, both of which attracted many followers from all over Europe.